Museum of Ordinary People invites public to document experiences of coronavirus

By Rosemary Collins, 23 March 2020 - 12:26pm

The #TheseTimes project will document the pandemic for future generations

Coronavirus UK
A man in a surgical mask and gloves walks through the deserted Cardiff city centre (Credit: Polly Thomas/ Getty Images)

Members of the public can share their experiences of living through coronavirus thanks to a new project from the Museum of Ordinary People (MOOP).

On Twitter, MOOP announced a new project, #TheseTimes, encouraging members of the UK public to share their personal experiences of the pandemic “as a reference for future generations”.

The museum said: “#TheseTimes invites people across the UK to submit their thoughts, feelings and experiences to our museum, which we will later collate as part of its permanent collection.

“This snapshot of daily life during #Covid19 will represent the experience for a diverse range of people – healthcare professionals, supermarket staff, those taking exams, freelancers, shift workers, those over 70, those who are self-isolating, or those supporting someone unwell.”

Based in Brighton, MOOP describes itself as “a new kind of museum that tells the stories of ordinary people, exploring and considering the magic and mundanity of ordinary life, chronicling hidden narratives and celebrating the ripples that we leave behind”.

Lucy Malone, co-founder of MOOP, said: ““We are experiencing our lives in new ways right now, and wondering what is to come.

“As much as this project is about collecting experiences, it's also about having an outlet to get down on paper how we are all feeling.”

To take part in #TheseTimes, email MOOP on museumofordinarypeople@gmail.com.

Participants are asked to record their lives each day in a notebook.

They can take part as an individual or with their families or loved ones.

They can also include drawings, photographs, collage and other creative works.

The MOOP guidelines say: “Your journal can be any size, lined or plain. Feel free to stick larger paper inside, fold things in, stick envelopes in and fill them up, expand the journal pages, stitch extra bits to the outside, add photos, or decorate the covers.”

You can share the results on social media, tagging @MuseumOrdinary on Twitter and Facebook and @MuseumofOrdinaryPeople on Instagram.

 

 

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